14 differences between an Aussie friend and a normal friend
1.
A normal friend will always be respectful.An Aussie friend will affectionately call you a bastard, dickhead, or whatever their particularly favorite derogatory term might be.
2.
A normal friend might show some concern if this is your third night in a row drinking a six-pack.An Aussie friend will gladly sit along and drink with you at any time of day.
3.
A normal friend would never think to pay you off with alcohol.An Aussie friend will give you a tipple for any small favor you perform for them. Helping a friend move will at least garner a six pack or a slab.
4.
A normal friend will whip you up something to eat when you’re feeling bad.An Aussie friend will whip you up something surprisingly simple and delicious and serve it with a “cuppa” or a glass of red wine.
5.
A normal friend always says “thank you.”An Aussie friend never says “thank you.” They might say “ta.” But how good of a friend can you be if you have to be polite?
Keep reading
14 differences between an Aussie friend and a normal friend
1.

A normal friend will always be respectful.
An Aussie friend will affectionately call you a bastard, dickhead, or whatever their particularly favorite derogatory term might be.

2.

A normal friend might show some concern if this is your third night in a row drinking a six-pack.
An Aussie friend will gladly sit along and drink with you at any time of day.

3.

A normal friend would never think to pay you off with alcohol.
An Aussie friend will give you a tipple for any small favor you perform for them. Helping a friend move will at least garner a six pack or a slab.

4.

A normal friend will whip you up something to eat when you’re feeling bad.
An Aussie friend will whip you up something surprisingly simple and delicious and serve it with a “cuppa” or a glass of red wine.

5.

A normal friend always says “thank you.”
An Aussie friend never says “thank you.” They might say “ta.” But how good of a friend can you be if you have to be polite?

Keep reading

11 signs you’re from Alaska

1. You never say the words “Aurora Borealis.”
But you do mention the Northern Lights in two specific situations: First, in response to the scientifically accurate yet orally laborious “Aurora Borealis” by retorting, “Oh, you mean the Northern Lights?” (Alaskan for, “Ain’t from here, are ya?”)
And second, when saying “I was out on Northern Lights,” which indicates that you visited (or drove by) the store that makes every outdoorsy, granola, sock-clad, Birkenstock-wearing Alaskan heart swoon: REI.
2. You have mixed feelings about “bunny boots.”
“Bunny boots” conjure up all sorts of warm fuzzy hops down Nostalgia Lane. You have a sort of love-hate relationship with those winter boots with the bulbous toes, white outer rubber, and funky side air valves.
Originally a military thing (they’re officially called “extreme cold vapor barrier boots”), you hijacked your first pair from your dad. You wore them to tromp around the house as a wee thing, and then later to begrudgingly trek from house to woodpile in -30°F weather once you got old enough to be sent outside for firewood.
3. Your family owns a lot of vehicles and their accompanying accessories.
At least seven of the following are counted among your assets (friends’ and neighbors’ belongings included): a trailer(s), a camper, a motorhome, a 3-wheeler, a 4-wheeler, a 5th wheel, a snow machine, a snowblower, a bobcat, a 2-door truck, a 4-door truck, an SUV, a minivan, a 4WD, a 2WD, a bus, an airplane, a boat, a dinghy, a canoe, a Zodiac, a kayak, a mountain bike, a bike rack, a ski rack, a boat rack, and a dog sled.
And that’s just the starter kit.
Keep reading
1. You never say the words “Aurora Borealis.”

But you do mention the Northern Lights in two specific situations:
First, in response to the scientifically accurate yet orally laborious “Aurora Borealis” by retorting, “Oh, you mean the Northern Lights?” (Alaskan for, “Ain’t from here, are ya?”)

And second, when saying “I was out on Northern Lights,” which indicates that you visited (or drove by) the store that makes every outdoorsy, granola, sock-clad, Birkenstock-wearing Alaskan heart swoon: REI.

2. You have mixed feelings about “bunny boots.”

“Bunny boots” conjure up all sorts of warm fuzzy hops down Nostalgia Lane. You have a sort of love-hate relationship with those winter boots with the bulbous toes, white outer rubber, and funky side air valves.

Originally a military thing (they’re officially called “extreme cold vapor barrier boots”), you hijacked your first pair from your dad. You wore them to tromp around the house as a wee thing, and then later to begrudgingly trek from house to woodpile in -30°F weather once you got old enough to be sent outside for firewood.

3. Your family owns a lot of vehicles and their accompanying accessories.

At least seven of the following are counted among your assets (friends’ and neighbors’ belongings included): a trailer(s), a camper, a motorhome, a 3-wheeler, a 4-wheeler, a 5th wheel, a snow machine, a snowblower, a bobcat, a 2-door truck, a 4-door truck, an SUV, a minivan, a 4WD, a 2WD, a bus, an airplane, a boat, a dinghy, a canoe, a Zodiac, a kayak, a mountain bike, a bike rack, a ski rack, a boat rack, and a dog sled.

And that’s just the starter kit.

imageKeep reading

Are these ruins Sochi’s future?

In 1984, the very first Winter Olympics taking place in a communist state was held in the unique and remarkable city of Sarajevo — then a thriving metropolis in the now-defunct host nation Yugoslavia, now the modern capital city of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2014 — 30 years after the Sarajevo Winter Olympics — the seaside Russian city of Sochi also held the attention of television viewers, in the way only a former communist nation in a world entranced by Western media can, as it played host to the XXII Olympic Winter Games.

Yugoslavia doesn’t exist anymore, except in the minds of Yugo-stalgic lovers of all things Tito. Bosnia and Herzegovina is a democracy. Russia has given communism the flick, moving toward a decidedly more corporatocracy. And the cities of Sochi and Sarajevo share something else in common — an abandoned Winter Olympic site. As Sochi begins its inevitable decay, perhaps the abandoned Winter Olympic bobsled track high on Mount Trebević above Sarajevo will be an eerily accurate bellwether for Sochi’s Imeritinsky Beach.

At the time, a record 49 nations participated in the 1984 Winter Olympics. Tens of thousands of spectators covering Mount Trebević cheered on the brave Sarajevo bobsled and luge competitors, as they raced down the 1.3km track at speeds of over 100 km/h, in snowy, blustery conditions. For several years after the Olympics, the Sarajevo bobsled track was used for world cup competitions. And then came the rub. When 1991 rolled around, the ugly and complex Yugoslav wars commenced, and the Olympic bobsled location was utilised by military forces as an artillery position.
More photos
In 1984, the very first Winter Olympics taking place in a communist state was held in the unique and remarkable city of Sarajevo — then a thriving metropolis in the now-defunct host nation Yugoslavia, now the modern capital city of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2014 — 30 years after the Sarajevo Winter Olympics — the seaside Russian city of Sochi also held the attention of television viewers, in the way only a former communist nation in a world entranced by Western media can, as it played host to the XXII Olympic Winter Games.

finish-bobsled-track-sarajevo

Yugoslavia doesn’t exist anymore, except in the minds of Yugo-stalgic lovers of all things Tito. Bosnia and Herzegovina is a democracy. Russia has given communism the flick, moving toward a decidedly more corporatocracy. And the cities of Sochi and Sarajevo share something else in common — an abandoned Winter Olympic site. As Sochi begins its inevitable decay, perhaps the abandoned Winter Olympic bobsled track high on Mount Trebević above Sarajevo will be an eerily accurate bellwether for Sochi’s Imeritinsky Beach.

bobsled-track-sarajevo-trebevic-2

At the time, a record 49 nations participated in the 1984 Winter Olympics. Tens of thousands of spectators covering Mount Trebević cheered on the brave Sarajevo bobsled and luge competitors, as they raced down the 1.3km track at speeds of over 100 km/h, in snowy, blustery conditions. For several years after the Olympics, the Sarajevo bobsled track was used for world cup competitions. And then came the rub. When 1991 rolled around, the ugly and complex Yugoslav wars commenced, and the Olympic bobsled location was utilised by military forces as an artillery position.

More photos


9 reasons to give SUPing a try
I CAME ABOUT stand-up paddle (SUP) boarding the same way I came about the majority of my college drug experiences: I’d never done it before, but I had heard good reviews. So I just bought one because I was pretty confident that I’d be a happy customer. This method hasn’t always worked for me. But it did work with SUPing.
1. You’re probably not going to fall.

If you have a basic grasp of walking and you’ve conquered a few hopscotch games in your day, there’s a good chance you will not hurt yourself on a SUP board.
Sometimes you come up against sudden winds or whitecap conditions. Seeing as you are basically acting as a giant mast, this can be terrifying. When I’m terrified, as a rule, I just sit down. An expert paddler once told me this was a pussy-move. She can shut it. Let’s move on.
2. You’ll get toned arms.
I’m no fitness expert, but I’m pretty sure SUPing is good exercise. I often get into the water feeling very Bridget Jones-y. But I usually leave feeling pretty 1982 Jane Fonda, genetic mutation that she is.
3. You can surf on them!
SUP boards are generally longer than a standard surfboard, but you can take them into surf and either stand-up paddle or paddle with your arms. If you’re going to bring your SUP board into surf, I’ve found it’s good etiquette to stay in your own area and away from actual surfers. Your paddle can become a huge Gandalf staff in no time at all. And that is a dangerous weapon.
I’ve also found that many areas with surf breaks offer SUP surfing clinics, which are usually hosted by local surf shops. And those are sweet. Sometimes they’re free.
Continue Reading

9 reasons to give SUPing a try

I CAME ABOUT stand-up paddle (SUP) boarding the same way I came about the majority of my college drug experiences: I’d never done it before, but I had heard good reviews. So I just bought one because I was pretty confident that I’d be a happy customer. This method hasn’t always worked for me. But it did work with SUPing.

1. You’re probably not going to fall.

If you have a basic grasp of walking and you’ve conquered a few hopscotch games in your day, there’s a good chance you will not hurt yourself on a SUP board.

Sometimes you come up against sudden winds or whitecap conditions. Seeing as you are basically acting as a giant mast, this can be terrifying. When I’m terrified, as a rule, I just sit down. An expert paddler once told me this was a pussy-move. She can shut it. Let’s move on.

2. You’ll get toned arms.

I’m no fitness expert, but I’m pretty sure SUPing is good exercise. I often get into the water feeling very Bridget Jones-y. But I usually leave feeling pretty 1982 Jane Fonda, genetic mutation that she is.

3. You can surf on them!

SUP boards are generally longer than a standard surfboard, but you can take them into surf and either stand-up paddle or paddle with your arms. If you’re going to bring your SUP board into surf, I’ve found it’s good etiquette to stay in your own area and away from actual surfers. Your paddle can become a huge Gandalf staff in no time at all. And that is a dangerous weapon.

I’ve also found that many areas with surf breaks offer SUP surfing clinics, which are usually hosted by local surf shops. And those are sweet. Sometimes they’re free.

Continue Reading

Spam for foodies (with recipes)

WHEN I WAS A KID, my Chinese dad used to make me instant noodles with Spam and egg on top as an after-school snack. I loved the hot and savory soup, and always saved the perfect little rectangle of bologna-tasting meat with a gelatinous glaze for last. As I grew older and discovered the foodie scene, I shunned the canned meat as the very worst kind of processed food. Admitting to liking Spam was as bad as liking Big Macs or Cheeze Whiz among my Whole Foods-shopping, organic-wine-growing foodie friends.
But now, through my travels, I’m rediscovering the joys of Hormel’s treasure in a tin can. And I’m realizing that it’s not at all stigmatized in many parts of the world. No, it’s not the healthiest thing to eat out there, and yes, you might as well shoot the sodium right into your blood stream. But a little taste of Spam can be surprisingly yummy and comforting. It’s especially popular in Asia and the Pacific Islands. Look out for these “foodie” dishes the next time you’re traveling.
1. Spam musubi
This is said to be one of Hawaii-born President Obama’s favorite dishes. It’s simply cooked rice and grilled Spam wrapped with dried seaweed — a reflection of Hawaii’s Asian and Western influences. You can find it anywhere on the islands, and it makes a very satisfying post-surf snack.
Recipe: 1 can of Spam 2 cups of cooked rice 2 tablespoons sweet soy sauce 4 sheets of nori, cut in half
Cut Spam into eight equal pieces and fry until crisp on the outside. Add the sweet soy sauce to the pan, coat each piece, turn heat down to low. Wait until the soy sauce thickens. Place nori sheet down on a cutting board, scoop a generous amount of rice and pack it down. Add a slice of Spam and another layer of rice, packing it down. Wrap the nori around the rice and seal the edges with a bit of water.
2. Budae jigae, or Korean army stew

Photo: Gene Han 

Food was scarce in Seoul after the Korean War. Resourceful cooks made use of surplus foods, including our very favorite meat in a can. Spam was mixed into a spicy soup flavored with kimchi and red chili paste. The dish is also called Johnson Tang, named after President Lyndon B. Johnson and tang, a word meaning soup. Have it with lots of rice and an OB beer.
3. Beer-battered Spam fries
Served at Maharlika in NYC, which specializes in Filipino cuisine, these fries have a crispy outside and a chewy, oily inside. Try them with banana sauce, the ketchup of the Philippines, and you won’t be able to stop after just one fry.
4. Goya champuru, or bitter melon and Spam stir fry

Photo: Pelican

This is a recipe from Okinawa, which comprises the southernmost islands of Japan. The bitter taste of the vegetable, which originates in China, marries beautifully with the salty, fatty taste of the canned meat that became common in this area after the US military set up a base on the islands. Given that Okinawa has more people aged 100 and over than any other region in the world, maybe this dish holds the secret to longevity.
5. Spam loco moco

Photo: Michael Saechang

Popular throughout the Pacific islands, this includes rice topped with a slice of Spam and an egg, all smothered in brown gravy. Be prepared for a serious food coma.
Recipe: 1 egg Cooked rice Hot prepared gravy Hot pepper sauce Tomato ketchup Soy Sauce
Cut up a few pieces of Spam and fry to your liking. Fry egg (sunny-side up or over easy) in the grease left over. Assemble this dish by putting a bed of cooked rice in a large bowl, top with Spam, fried egg, and 1 to 2 ladles of hot gravy. Add hot pepper sauce, ketchup, or soy sauce to taste.
Want more Spam recipes? Find them here. Still can’t get enough of the stuff? Check out the annual Waikiki Spam Jam, during which several of Honolulu’s finest restaurants serve up some pretty creative dishes that would tempt any serious foodie. Give Spam another try. You may be surprised.
WHEN I WAS A KID, my Chinese dad used to make me instant noodles with Spam and egg on top as an after-school snack. I loved the hot and savory soup, and always saved the perfect little rectangle of bologna-tasting meat with a gelatinous glaze for last. As I grew older and discovered the foodie scene, I shunned the canned meat as the very worst kind of processed food. Admitting to liking Spam was as bad as liking Big Macs or Cheeze Whiz among my Whole Foods-shopping, organic-wine-growing foodie friends.

But now, through my travels, I’m rediscovering the joys of Hormel’s treasure in a tin can. And I’m realizing that it’s not at all stigmatized in many parts of the world. No, it’s not the healthiest thing to eat out there, and yes, you might as well shoot the sodium right into your blood stream. But a little taste of Spam can be surprisingly yummy and comforting. It’s especially popular in Asia and the Pacific Islands. Look out for these “foodie” dishes the next time you’re traveling.

1. Spam musubi

This is said to be one of Hawaii-born President Obama’s favorite dishes. It’s simply cooked rice and grilled Spam wrapped with dried seaweed — a reflection of Hawaii’s Asian and Western influences. You can find it anywhere on the islands, and it makes a very satisfying post-surf snack.

Recipe:
1 can of Spam
2 cups of cooked rice
2 tablespoons sweet soy sauce
4 sheets of nori, cut in half

Cut Spam into eight equal pieces and fry until crisp on the outside. Add the sweet soy sauce to the pan, coat each piece, turn heat down to low. Wait until the soy sauce thickens. Place nori sheet down on a cutting board, scoop a generous amount of rice and pack it down. Add a slice of Spam and another layer of rice, packing it down. Wrap the nori around the rice and seal the edges with a bit of water.

2. Budae jigae, or Korean army stew

Korean army stew

Photo: Gene Han

Food was scarce in Seoul after the Korean War. Resourceful cooks made use of surplus foods, including our very favorite meat in a can. Spam was mixed into a spicy soup flavored with kimchi and red chili paste. The dish is also called Johnson Tang, named after President Lyndon B. Johnson and tang, a word meaning soup. Have it with lots of rice and an OB beer.

3. Beer-battered Spam fries

Served at Maharlika in NYC, which specializes in Filipino cuisine, these fries have a crispy outside and a chewy, oily inside. Try them with banana sauce, the ketchup of the Philippines, and you won’t be able to stop after just one fry.

4. Goya champuru, or bitter melon and Spam stir fry

Goya Champuru

Photo: Pelican

This is a recipe from Okinawa, which comprises the southernmost islands of Japan. The bitter taste of the vegetable, which originates in China, marries beautifully with the salty, fatty taste of the canned meat that became common in this area after the US military set up a base on the islands. Given that Okinawa has more people aged 100 and over than any other region in the world, maybe this dish holds the secret to longevity.

5. Spam loco moco

Popular throughout the Pacific islands, this includes rice topped with a slice of Spam and an egg, all smothered in brown gravy. Be prepared for a serious food coma.

Recipe:
1 egg
Cooked rice
Hot prepared gravy
Hot pepper sauce
Tomato ketchup
Soy Sauce

Cut up a few pieces of Spam and fry to your liking. Fry egg (sunny-side up or over easy) in the grease left over. Assemble this dish by putting a bed of cooked rice in a large bowl, top with Spam, fried egg, and 1 to 2 ladles of hot gravy. Add hot pepper sauce, ketchup, or soy sauce to taste.

Want more Spam recipes? Find them here. Still can’t get enough of the stuff? Check out the annual Waikiki Spam Jam, during which several of Honolulu’s finest restaurants serve up some pretty creative dishes that would tempt any serious foodie. Give Spam another try. You may be surprised. image


…your local connction 

1. Snow ski in the mountains and water ski in the Mediterranean in the span of four hours.
Lebanon is one of the smallest countries in the world, but it’s also one of the most diverse — set against the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Lebanon goes from sea level to an elevation of over 10,000 feet rather quickly. The country’s ski season typically runs from December to April. In the spring, the weather often also happens to be perfect for a day at the beach. On an ideal spring day, one can hit the slopes in the morning, followed by a dip in the Mediterranean’s refreshing waters in the afternoon.
2. Witness a fistfight over a World Cup match involving foreign soccer teams.
This is one of Lebanon’s many inexplicable phenomena. Soccer fans in Lebanon don’t take the sport lightly, especially when the Brazilian, German, Italian, or French teams are involved. After any of the aforementioned wins a World Cup match, you’ll witness caravans of cars passing by, clad in flags of the victorious country, horns blaring in unison, jamming traffic in the process. On occasion, you’ll see a fight between two people who took said match far too seriously.
3. Pair your dinner with an argileh at any Lebanese restaurant in the country.
In the United States, you typically visit a “hookah bar” when you want to smoke argileh. In Lebanon, you just go out to eat Lebanese food (“mezze,” if you’re in the know). Someone at your table will inevitably request an argileh be brought out. And you’ll have your choice of just about any flavor that comes to mind.
4. See a bikini-clad Lebanese woman next to a veiled tourist at the beach.
Lebanon is well known for being a vacation destination for the people of the Persian Gulf, many of whom wear the traditional hijab. Many Lebanese are rather liberal in comparison to the people of Lebanon’s neighboring countries — short skirts, high heels, and bikinis are a daily sight. Make an appearance at one of Lebanon’s extravagant beach resorts and you may come across a woman in her bikini lying a chair away from another wearing the traditional Muslim garb. Try finding that sight elsewhere in the region.
5. See the ruins of 15 civilizations mere steps from an average dinner at TGI Fridays.
TGI Fridays in downtown Beirut doesn’t need to be discussed — it’s TGI Fridays. Steps away, however, you’ll find the Garden of Forgiveness, a sociocultural project located along the Green Line which divided the city during the Lebanese Civil War. The site, uncovered layer by layer over the years, is filled with the ruins of 15 civilizations. The most notable are those of Berytus, the Roman city that existed where Beirut currently sits.
6. Spend eight hours at the beach, but only because you overpaid to get in.
The country’s Mediterranean coast is lined with impressive beach resort after beach resort. Beach parties at Oceana can make Las Vegas look like Reno. And yes, for some reason, if you want to go to a nice, sandy beach, you have to pay for it.
You won’t find too many free beaches here. (Try Bain Militaire if you’re looking for a “bargain.”) No matter where you go, eight hours at the beach is a long time. Too long — but you’re going to get your money’s worth! That’s also why nearly every Lebanese person you see is both perpetually sunburnt and twice as tan as usual during the summer.
7. Go clubbing on the former site of a civil war refugee camp.
It might sound immoral. It could be. It couldn’t be. We’re not here to judge. Either way, B 018 is one of Lebanon’s best-known nightlife spots. Even comedian Russell Peters ranted about it for a not-so-short moment. The spot may sound dingy, though it’s anything but. The club is one level underground. You can’t see what’s going on from street level, unless you get really close, and that’s only because the roof retracts to reveal the nighttime stars and city surroundings when the weather’s appropriate.
8. Learn to speak Arabic, English, and French. In the same breath.
The Lebanese are taught several languages in school. (Lebanon was a French mandate before 1943, if you’re wondering about the reasoning behind the French.)
“Hi. Keefak. Ça va?” is a phrase often heard. “Hi.” That’s English. “Keefak?” That’s Arabic for “How are you?” “Ça va?” That’s French for “How’s it going?” That’s three languages. There’s no real explanation as to why they need to be used in one sentence, but if you want to sound like you’re part of the in-crowd, just do it. 
 From: 8 experiences unique to Lebanon // http://ift.tt/1jCp3WX
1. Snow ski in the mountains and water ski in the Mediterranean in the span of four hours.

Lebanon is one of the smallest countries in the world, but it’s also one of the most diverse — set against the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Lebanon goes from sea level to an elevation of over 10,000 feet rather quickly. The country’s ski season typically runs from December to April. In the spring, the weather often also happens to be perfect for a day at the beach. On an ideal spring day, one can hit the slopes in the morning, followed by a dip in the Mediterranean’s refreshing waters in the afternoon.

2. Witness a fistfight over a World Cup match involving foreign soccer teams.

This is one of Lebanon’s many inexplicable phenomena. Soccer fans in Lebanon don’t take the sport lightly, especially when the Brazilian, German, Italian, or French teams are involved. After any of the aforementioned wins a World Cup match, you’ll witness caravans of cars passing by, clad in flags of the victorious country, horns blaring in unison, jamming traffic in the process. On occasion, you’ll see a fight between two people who took said match far too seriously.

3. Pair your dinner with an argileh at any Lebanese restaurant in the country.

In the United States, you typically visit a “hookah bar” when you want to smoke argileh. In Lebanon, you just go out to eat Lebanese food (“mezze,” if you’re in the know). Someone at your table will inevitably request an argileh be brought out. And you’ll have your choice of just about any flavor that comes to mind.

4. See a bikini-clad Lebanese woman next to a veiled tourist at the beach.

Lebanon is well known for being a vacation destination for the people of the Persian Gulf, many of whom wear the traditional hijab. Many Lebanese are rather liberal in comparison to the people of Lebanon’s neighboring countries — short skirts, high heels, and bikinis are a daily sight. Make an appearance at one of Lebanon’s extravagant beach resorts and you may come across a woman in her bikini lying a chair away from another wearing the traditional Muslim garb. Try finding that sight elsewhere in the region.

5. See the ruins of 15 civilizations mere steps from an average dinner at TGI Fridays.

TGI Fridays in downtown Beirut doesn’t need to be discussed — it’s TGI Fridays. Steps away, however, you’ll find the Garden of Forgiveness, a sociocultural project located along the Green Line which divided the city during the Lebanese Civil War. The site, uncovered layer by layer over the years, is filled with the ruins of 15 civilizations. The most notable are those of Berytus, the Roman city that existed where Beirut currently sits.

6. Spend eight hours at the beach, but only because you overpaid to get in.

The country’s Mediterranean coast is lined with impressive beach resort after beach resort. Beach parties at Oceana can make Las Vegas look like Reno. And yes, for some reason, if you want to go to a nice, sandy beach, you have to pay for it.

You won’t find too many free beaches here. (Try Bain Militaire if you’re looking for a “bargain.”) No matter where you go, eight hours at the beach is a long time. Too long — but you’re going to get your money’s worth! That’s also why nearly every Lebanese person you see is both perpetually sunburnt and twice as tan as usual during the summer.

7. Go clubbing on the former site of a civil war refugee camp.

It might sound immoral. It could be. It couldn’t be. We’re not here to judge. Either way, B 018 is one of Lebanon’s best-known nightlife spots. Even comedian Russell Peters ranted about it for a not-so-short moment. The spot may sound dingy, though it’s anything but. The club is one level underground. You can’t see what’s going on from street level, unless you get really close, and that’s only because the roof retracts to reveal the nighttime stars and city surroundings when the weather’s appropriate.

8. Learn to speak Arabic, English, and French. In the same breath.

The Lebanese are taught several languages in school. (Lebanon was a French mandate before 1943, if you’re wondering about the reasoning behind the French.)

“Hi. Keefak. Ça va?” is a phrase often heard. “Hi.” That’s English. “Keefak?” That’s Arabic for “How are you?” “Ça va?” That’s French for “How’s it going?” That’s three languages. There’s no real explanation as to why they need to be used in one sentence, but if you want to sound like you’re part of the in-crowd, just do it.

From: 8 experiences unique to Lebanon // http://ift.tt/1jCp3WX

How to piss off someone from Vermont

WE HAVE A FUNNY THING in Vermont that I like to call the soft “T.” When we pronounce our home state, the hard “T” is replaced with a delicate yet guttural puff of air from the bottom of the throat, which can only be written out as accurately as: “Vermon(gh).”
It’s not pretty, but it’s pure. It’s spoken the same whether you’re a suburbanite in Chittenden County, or a dairy farmer in the North Country. It’s one of the many things Vermonters share, and we tend to care a lot about the things we share as a community. Treading heavily on those things just might piss us off.
1. Tell us you heard we have more cows than people.
Just don’t. It’s not true. We love our cows, though, and we’re very proud of our farmers, thank you very much.
2. Mistake us for New Hampshire.
See How to piss off someone from New Hampshire. Our legislature debates how to deliver universal healthcare, while theirs argues about whether to finally make driving without a seatbelt illegal. We still love our neighbor, though.
3. Tell us how much you love Ben & Jerry’s Half Baked.
We remember when Ben & Jerry’s was actually a local company, before it was bought by a behemoth that also makes soap and mayonnaise. We remember when the carton looked like this and the only flavors were chocolate, vanilla, and Cherry Garcia.
Okay, fine. That’s silly nostalgia. We still adore Ben & Jerry’s, even if neither Ben nor Jerry are involved anymore. To its credit, the company manages to preserve their core quality, brand, and most importantly, their social mission that’s deeply rooted in progressive Vermonter ideology. And Half Baked is amazing. We just don’t need a bunch of you telling us how good the ice cream is. We’ve known for years. 
Keep reading: How to piss off someone from Vermont
WE HAVE A FUNNY THING in Vermont that I like to call the soft “T.” When we pronounce our home state, the hard “T” is replaced with a delicate yet guttural puff of air from the bottom of the throat, which can only be written out as accurately as: “Vermon(gh).”

It’s not pretty, but it’s pure. It’s spoken the same whether you’re a suburbanite in Chittenden County, or a dairy farmer in the North Country. It’s one of the many things Vermonters share, and we tend to care a lot about the things we share as a community. Treading heavily on those things just might piss us off.

1. Tell us you heard we have more cows than people.

Just don’t. It’s not true. We love our cows, though, and we’re very proud of our farmers, thank you very much.

2. Mistake us for New Hampshire.

See How to piss off someone from New Hampshire. Our legislature debates how to deliver universal healthcare, while theirs argues about whether to finally make driving without a seatbelt illegal. We still love our neighbor, though.

3. Tell us how much you love Ben & Jerry’s Half Baked.

We remember when Ben & Jerry’s was actually a local company, before it was bought by a behemoth that also makes soap and mayonnaise. We remember when the carton looked like this and the only flavors were chocolate, vanilla, and Cherry Garcia.

Okay, fine. That’s silly nostalgia. We still adore Ben & Jerry’s, even if neither Ben nor Jerry are involved anymore. To its credit, the company manages to preserve their core quality, brand, and most importantly, their social mission that’s deeply rooted in progressive Vermonter ideology. And Half Baked is amazing. We just don’t need a bunch of you telling us how good the ice cream is. We’ve known for years.image

Keep reading: How to piss off someone from Vermont

On explaining travel to your parents 
1. Respect who you’re dealing with. They only want the best for you.
I once played an April Fools joke on my mom. I posted a photo of a hideous rose-themed neck tattoo on Facebook with the caption, “First tat! Go big or go home!” next to it.
When my mother saw this, she collapsed on the ground and was UNABLE TO BREATHE. This woman is an emotional grenade. She would physically explode if I were to make a bad decision for myself.
Your mom may or may not be similar. Either way, you totally crashed her “freewheelin’ woman doin’ whatever I want” party back in the ’90s, when you forced your way out of her loins and left her with frizzy hair and varicose veins. So respect that.
I don’t even have to tell you what dads go through. Fathering teenage daughters. Mini emotional grenades. That is not how I want to spend my late 30s / early 40s. I will tell you what.
2. Come clean about your finances.
How many times have you asked your dad what he wants for Father’s Day and he responds with something you absolutely cannot buy at Cabela’s? “I want you to be more responsible!”
When I tell my parents that I’m going on a trip, and they come back with, “It better be a trip to the bank!” I like to recite a number. I usually share with them exactly how much money I have in my savings account, money which I am saving for “things other then travel.”
Even if this number is small, it still says that in some minuscule way, I am saving for my “future.”
3. Take steps to ease their mind.
Take a self-defense class. Contact any trusted acquaintance you have at your destination and let your parents contact them as well. Get an international cell phone plan. Do anything you can to give your parents the confidence that you’re going to be okay.
When I went away for a few months to live on a sailboat with absolutely zero sailing experience, my parents were a tad uncomfortable with the idea. So I asked my captain to get a SPOT device, which is a satellite GPS messenger. And he did, no problem.
Continue

On explaining travel to your parents 

1. Respect who you’re dealing with. They only want the best for you.

I once played an April Fools joke on my mom. I posted a photo of a hideous rose-themed neck tattoo on Facebook with the caption, “First tat! Go big or go home!” next to it.

When my mother saw this, she collapsed on the ground and was UNABLE TO BREATHE. This woman is an emotional grenade. She would physically explode if I were to make a bad decision for myself.

Your mom may or may not be similar. Either way, you totally crashed her “freewheelin’ woman doin’ whatever I want” party back in the ’90s, when you forced your way out of her loins and left her with frizzy hair and varicose veins. So respect that.

I don’t even have to tell you what dads go through. Fathering teenage daughters. Mini emotional grenades. That is not how I want to spend my late 30s / early 40s. I will tell you what.

2. Come clean about your finances.

How many times have you asked your dad what he wants for Father’s Day and he responds with something you absolutely cannot buy at Cabela’s? “I want you to be more responsible!”

When I tell my parents that I’m going on a trip, and they come back with, “It better be a trip to the bank!” I like to recite a number. I usually share with them exactly how much money I have in my savings account, money which I am saving for “things other then travel.”

Even if this number is small, it still says that in some minuscule way, I am saving for my “future.”

3. Take steps to ease their mind.

Take a self-defense class. Contact any trusted acquaintance you have at your destination and let your parents contact them as well. Get an international cell phone plan. Do anything you can to give your parents the confidence that you’re going to be okay.

When I went away for a few months to live on a sailboat with absolutely zero sailing experience, my parents were a tad uncomfortable with the idea. So I asked my captain to get a SPOT device, which is a satellite GPS messenger. And he did, no problem.

Continue