13 things you’ll see in Jakarta
I WAS BORN AND RAISED in Jakarta until I was shipped off overseas for university. It wasn’t until I came back a few years later to the “Big Durian” that I experienced my own form of culture shock. Since then, I’ve developed a love / hate relationship with this city, which is probably how most people who visit also feel. Here are 13 things you’ll experience when you come.
1. 15 minutes of fame
If you’re Caucasian, you’ll probably be treated like Richard Branson. Poor locals will fall at your feet and kiss the steps you walk on, hoping you might grace them with your magical white touch and some dollar bills for their families. Walking down the city streets, or even traveling to the malls, means stares, questions, and at times, a few photographs with the bule (foreigner).
2. Cigarette ads everywhere
Many Indonesian citizens smoke, so don’t freak out when you enter a restaurant that allows smoking indoors. I’m pretty sure even the trees produce smoke instead of oxygen. The richest man in the country earns his wealth from tobacco, and the poorest man in the country will sell his soul for a cigarette. You see grade-school children around the city smoking, and even orangutans.
Every street has a billboard or banner promoting local cigarettes, although they’re all purposely vague (as per government regulations — the cigarette itself can’t actually be shown). There are disclaimers at the bottom of each ad, and at the end of every commercial it states smoking causes cancer and heart disease. This doesn’t really make an impact, but it helps the government feel a tad better. “Hey, at least I warned you this was going to happen!”
3. Gigantic malls
These aren’t your typical shopping centers. These are giant, marble-floored, extravagant malls, sometimes with apartments nestled on top for convenience (who wants to walk outside when you can go down the elevator in your pajamas to shop?). These malls seem to appear out of nowhere, and each one has a reputation.
There are around 173 malls in Jakarta, which means 173 places you can meet your friends. You go to shopping centers without the intention to shop, but to hang out at indoor cafés, restaurants, karaoke bars, or billiard lounges. Q Billiards is usually the go-to stop for people from different schools to meet up and mingle. OKCupid has nothing on Q.
Read more

I WAS BORN AND RAISED in Jakarta until I was shipped off overseas for university. It wasn’t until I came back a few years later to the “Big Durian” that I experienced my own form of culture shock. Since then, I’ve developed a love / hate relationship with this city, which is probably how most people who visit also feel. Here are 13 things you’ll experience when you come.

1. 15 minutes of fame

If you’re Caucasian, you’ll probably be treated like Richard Branson. Poor locals will fall at your feet and kiss the steps you walk on, hoping you might grace them with your magical white touch and some dollar bills for their families. Walking down the city streets, or even traveling to the malls, means stares, questions, and at times, a few photographs with the bule (foreigner).

2. Cigarette ads everywhere

Many Indonesian citizens smoke, so don’t freak out when you enter a restaurant that allows smoking indoors. I’m pretty sure even the trees produce smoke instead of oxygen. The richest man in the country earns his wealth from tobacco, and the poorest man in the country will sell his soul for a cigarette. You see grade-school children around the city smoking, and even orangutans.

Every street has a billboard or banner promoting local cigarettes, although they’re all purposely vague (as per government regulations — the cigarette itself can’t actually be shown). There are disclaimers at the bottom of each ad, and at the end of every commercial it states smoking causes cancer and heart disease. This doesn’t really make an impact, but it helps the government feel a tad better. “Hey, at least I warned you this was going to happen!”

3. Gigantic malls

These aren’t your typical shopping centers. These are giant, marble-floored, extravagant malls, sometimes with apartments nestled on top for convenience (who wants to walk outside when you can go down the elevator in your pajamas to shop?). These malls seem to appear out of nowhere, and each one has a reputation.

There are around 173 malls in Jakarta, which means 173 places you can meet your friends. You go to shopping centers without the intention to shop, but to hang out at indoor cafés, restaurants, karaoke bars, or billiard lounges. Q Billiards is usually the go-to stop for people from different schools to meet up and mingle. OKCupid has nothing on Q.

Read more

14 easy yet impressive campfire meals
DISCLAIMER: If you are about to embark on the Appalachian Trail and you just finished cutting all the tags out of your t-shirts, these recipes are probably not going to work for you. So just go back to quietly weighing your socks and scheming ways to dehydrate beer.
These meal ideas will work perfectly, however, for your next music festival, car camping trip, or backyard adventure.
1. Fish tacos
Grab some white fish. Mix some taco seasoning into a little container of sour cream. Slice up some avocado with a crunchy vegetable (I like radishes or purple cabbage) and throw it all onto a grilled mini corn tortilla. Boom. Taco party.
Tip: Use tinfoil to keep the fish from falling into the fire.
2. Grilled pineapple on a burger with sharp cheddar cheese
These don’t even need condiments. However, if you absolutely cannot eat a burger without at least one condiment, I recommend spicy mustard. Crumbled blue cheese could also work here.
3. Nachos
Throw everything you would put on a nacho in a cast iron skillet: onions, black beans, jalapeños, green peppers, I don’t need to tell you what goes on a nacho. Make multiple layers. You should be doing this in your normal nacho making, but you should especially be doing it here.
Cover it all with some kind of lid (a stainless steel plate, a pot lid, another skillet) and let it sit for maybe 10 minutes. Just keep an eye on it and you’ll be fine. Top with sour cream, avocado, and sliced tomato. The best cheese for nachos is NOT Monterey Jack. It is freshly grated, extra sharp cheddar cheese. Don’t argue with me on that.
4. Salad pizza
I invented this in college. Get some pita bread. Throw it on the grill and melt some cheese on it (feta and mozzarella combo?). Take it off and top it with lettuce, tomatoes, onions, whatever. Dress it with some vinegar, olive oil, and dill. Slice it up. Pretend it’s a pizza.
5. Crispy fancy kale
Toast a sprig of kale like a marshmallow (pinkies out!). Is the fire too hot for your dainty fingers? Poke a shish kabob stick in it and quit complaining. Immediately dip your crispy kale into a mixture of soy sauce, olive oil, and hot sauce.
6. Fried bologna sandwich
Don’t turn your nose up at bologna. Throw it on the grill and make it curl up at the edges. Put it on an egg sandwich with some cheese and mayonnaise.
7. Spin-off tomato soup with grilled cheese
Get a can of whatever soup you’re partial to. Fire-roast some tomatoes over the fire and add them to the soup. Eat a grilled cheese. Grilled cheeses are even better with mayonnaise and Sambal on them.
See the rest

DISCLAIMER: If you are about to embark on the Appalachian Trail and you just finished cutting all the tags out of your t-shirts, these recipes are probably not going to work for you. So just go back to quietly weighing your socks and scheming ways to dehydrate beer.

These meal ideas will work perfectly, however, for your next music festival, car camping trip, or backyard adventure.

1. Fish tacos

Grab some white fish. Mix some taco seasoning into a little container of sour cream. Slice up some avocado with a crunchy vegetable (I like radishes or purple cabbage) and throw it all onto a grilled mini corn tortilla. Boom. Taco party.

Tip: Use tinfoil to keep the fish from falling into the fire.

2. Grilled pineapple on a burger with sharp cheddar cheese

These don’t even need condiments. However, if you absolutely cannot eat a burger without at least one condiment, I recommend spicy mustard. Crumbled blue cheese could also work here.

3. Nachos

Throw everything you would put on a nacho in a cast iron skillet: onions, black beans, jalapeños, green peppers, I don’t need to tell you what goes on a nacho. Make multiple layers. You should be doing this in your normal nacho making, but you should especially be doing it here.

Cover it all with some kind of lid (a stainless steel plate, a pot lid, another skillet) and let it sit for maybe 10 minutes. Just keep an eye on it and you’ll be fine. Top with sour cream, avocado, and sliced tomato. The best cheese for nachos is NOT Monterey Jack. It is freshly grated, extra sharp cheddar cheese. Don’t argue with me on that.

4. Salad pizza

I invented this in college. Get some pita bread. Throw it on the grill and melt some cheese on it (feta and mozzarella combo?). Take it off and top it with lettuce, tomatoes, onions, whatever. Dress it with some vinegar, olive oil, and dill. Slice it up. Pretend it’s a pizza.

5. Crispy fancy kale

Toast a sprig of kale like a marshmallow (pinkies out!). Is the fire too hot for your dainty fingers? Poke a shish kabob stick in it and quit complaining. Immediately dip your crispy kale into a mixture of soy sauce, olive oil, and hot sauce.

6. Fried bologna sandwich

Don’t turn your nose up at bologna. Throw it on the grill and make it curl up at the edges. Put it on an egg sandwich with some cheese and mayonnaise.

7. Spin-off tomato soup with grilled cheese

Get a can of whatever soup you’re partial to. Fire-roast some tomatoes over the fire and add them to the soup. Eat a grilled cheese. Grilled cheeses are even better with mayonnaise and Sambal on them.

See the rest

26 signs you’re a crunchy mama
1.  Making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich involves grinding the wheat, baking the bread, and picking the berries.
2.  You gave birth at home. Unassisted. Out in the garden.
3.  You froze your own placenta after birth and now enjoy daily “pick-me-up” smoothies.
4.  Your Twitter profile proudly says “Intactivist.” In the grocery store, you ask strangers with baby boys whether or not they chose to genitally mutilate their child. You don’t even have a son.
5.  You make your own cloth diapers. Which you line with inserts of moss. That you harvested in the forest and dried.
6.  You practice elimination communication with your child on a composting toilet.
7.  When your child walks through the front door from school and asks for milk, you whip out your breast.
8.  You’ve breast fed someone else’s crying baby. Without asking.
9.  You meticulously charted your cervical mucus when you wanted to conceive.
Keep reading

1. Making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich involves grinding the wheat, baking the bread, and picking the berries.

2. You gave birth at home. Unassisted. Out in the garden.

3. You froze your own placenta after birth and now enjoy daily “pick-me-up” smoothies.

4. Your Twitter profile proudly says “Intactivist.” In the grocery store, you ask strangers with baby boys whether or not they chose to genitally mutilate their child. You don’t even have a son.

5. You make your own cloth diapers. Which you line with inserts of moss. That you harvested in the forest and dried.

6. You practice elimination communication with your child on a composting toilet.

7. When your child walks through the front door from school and asks for milk, you whip out your breast.

8. You’ve breast fed someone else’s crying baby. Without asking.

9. You meticulously charted your cervical mucus when you wanted to conceive.

Keep reading

The worst airplane seats
I FEEL LIKE the aviation industry is legitimately trying to make air travel the least comfortable experience possible. Airlines keep charging for things like snacks, seat preference, and now carry-on luggage, while downgrading their services and environments. Case in point: the Airbus patent for a new in-flight seat design.
Upgrading flights with this ludicrous structure will end up costing airlines millions of dollars, will provide zero comfort on even short-haul flights, and I bet they will still find ways to overcharge passengers. (You want to sit for the duration of the flight? That’ll be an additional $25. It’s free to stand though!)

If I have to sit for nearly 18 hours in a confined space, with absolutely no control on how the vehicle is driven, or any way of stopping to stretch my legs and take in a bit of scenery, I’m expecting the most comfort my wallet can afford. I know this is only a “concept” patent, but please Airbus, cease this process before it gets worse. 

I FEEL LIKE the aviation industry is legitimately trying to make air travel the least comfortable experience possible. Airlines keep charging for things like snacks, seat preference, and now carry-on luggage, while downgrading their services and environments. Case in point: the Airbus patent for a new in-flight seat design.

Upgrading flights with this ludicrous structure will end up costing airlines millions of dollars, will provide zero comfort on even short-haul flights, and I bet they will still find ways to overcharge passengers. (You want to sit for the duration of the flight? That’ll be an additional $25. It’s free to stand though!)

Photo: Airbus/Espacenet

If I have to sit for nearly 18 hours in a confined space, with absolutely no control on how the vehicle is driven, or any way of stopping to stretch my legs and take in a bit of scenery, I’m expecting the most comfort my wallet can afford. I know this is only a “concept” patent, but please Airbus, cease this process before it gets worse. 

14 differences between an Aussie friend and a normal friend
1.
A normal friend will always be respectful.An Aussie friend will affectionately call you a bastard, dickhead, or whatever their particularly favorite derogatory term might be.
2.
A normal friend might show some concern if this is your third night in a row drinking a six-pack.An Aussie friend will gladly sit along and drink with you at any time of day.
3.
A normal friend would never think to pay you off with alcohol.An Aussie friend will give you a tipple for any small favor you perform for them. Helping a friend move will at least garner a six pack or a slab.
4.
A normal friend will whip you up something to eat when you’re feeling bad.An Aussie friend will whip you up something surprisingly simple and delicious and serve it with a “cuppa” or a glass of red wine.
5.
A normal friend always says “thank you.”An Aussie friend never says “thank you.” They might say “ta.” But how good of a friend can you be if you have to be polite?
Keep reading
14 differences between an Aussie friend and a normal friend
1.

A normal friend will always be respectful.
An Aussie friend will affectionately call you a bastard, dickhead, or whatever their particularly favorite derogatory term might be.

2.

A normal friend might show some concern if this is your third night in a row drinking a six-pack.
An Aussie friend will gladly sit along and drink with you at any time of day.

3.

A normal friend would never think to pay you off with alcohol.
An Aussie friend will give you a tipple for any small favor you perform for them. Helping a friend move will at least garner a six pack or a slab.

4.

A normal friend will whip you up something to eat when you’re feeling bad.
An Aussie friend will whip you up something surprisingly simple and delicious and serve it with a “cuppa” or a glass of red wine.

5.

A normal friend always says “thank you.”
An Aussie friend never says “thank you.” They might say “ta.” But how good of a friend can you be if you have to be polite?

Keep reading

11 signs you’re from Alaska

1. You never say the words “Aurora Borealis.”
But you do mention the Northern Lights in two specific situations: First, in response to the scientifically accurate yet orally laborious “Aurora Borealis” by retorting, “Oh, you mean the Northern Lights?” (Alaskan for, “Ain’t from here, are ya?”)
And second, when saying “I was out on Northern Lights,” which indicates that you visited (or drove by) the store that makes every outdoorsy, granola, sock-clad, Birkenstock-wearing Alaskan heart swoon: REI.
2. You have mixed feelings about “bunny boots.”
“Bunny boots” conjure up all sorts of warm fuzzy hops down Nostalgia Lane. You have a sort of love-hate relationship with those winter boots with the bulbous toes, white outer rubber, and funky side air valves.
Originally a military thing (they’re officially called “extreme cold vapor barrier boots”), you hijacked your first pair from your dad. You wore them to tromp around the house as a wee thing, and then later to begrudgingly trek from house to woodpile in -30°F weather once you got old enough to be sent outside for firewood.
3. Your family owns a lot of vehicles and their accompanying accessories.
At least seven of the following are counted among your assets (friends’ and neighbors’ belongings included): a trailer(s), a camper, a motorhome, a 3-wheeler, a 4-wheeler, a 5th wheel, a snow machine, a snowblower, a bobcat, a 2-door truck, a 4-door truck, an SUV, a minivan, a 4WD, a 2WD, a bus, an airplane, a boat, a dinghy, a canoe, a Zodiac, a kayak, a mountain bike, a bike rack, a ski rack, a boat rack, and a dog sled.
And that’s just the starter kit.
Keep reading
1. You never say the words “Aurora Borealis.”

But you do mention the Northern Lights in two specific situations:
First, in response to the scientifically accurate yet orally laborious “Aurora Borealis” by retorting, “Oh, you mean the Northern Lights?” (Alaskan for, “Ain’t from here, are ya?”)

And second, when saying “I was out on Northern Lights,” which indicates that you visited (or drove by) the store that makes every outdoorsy, granola, sock-clad, Birkenstock-wearing Alaskan heart swoon: REI.

2. You have mixed feelings about “bunny boots.”

“Bunny boots” conjure up all sorts of warm fuzzy hops down Nostalgia Lane. You have a sort of love-hate relationship with those winter boots with the bulbous toes, white outer rubber, and funky side air valves.

Originally a military thing (they’re officially called “extreme cold vapor barrier boots”), you hijacked your first pair from your dad. You wore them to tromp around the house as a wee thing, and then later to begrudgingly trek from house to woodpile in -30°F weather once you got old enough to be sent outside for firewood.

3. Your family owns a lot of vehicles and their accompanying accessories.

At least seven of the following are counted among your assets (friends’ and neighbors’ belongings included): a trailer(s), a camper, a motorhome, a 3-wheeler, a 4-wheeler, a 5th wheel, a snow machine, a snowblower, a bobcat, a 2-door truck, a 4-door truck, an SUV, a minivan, a 4WD, a 2WD, a bus, an airplane, a boat, a dinghy, a canoe, a Zodiac, a kayak, a mountain bike, a bike rack, a ski rack, a boat rack, and a dog sled.

And that’s just the starter kit.

imageKeep reading

Are these ruins Sochi’s future?

In 1984, the very first Winter Olympics taking place in a communist state was held in the unique and remarkable city of Sarajevo — then a thriving metropolis in the now-defunct host nation Yugoslavia, now the modern capital city of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2014 — 30 years after the Sarajevo Winter Olympics — the seaside Russian city of Sochi also held the attention of television viewers, in the way only a former communist nation in a world entranced by Western media can, as it played host to the XXII Olympic Winter Games.

Yugoslavia doesn’t exist anymore, except in the minds of Yugo-stalgic lovers of all things Tito. Bosnia and Herzegovina is a democracy. Russia has given communism the flick, moving toward a decidedly more corporatocracy. And the cities of Sochi and Sarajevo share something else in common — an abandoned Winter Olympic site. As Sochi begins its inevitable decay, perhaps the abandoned Winter Olympic bobsled track high on Mount Trebević above Sarajevo will be an eerily accurate bellwether for Sochi’s Imeritinsky Beach.

At the time, a record 49 nations participated in the 1984 Winter Olympics. Tens of thousands of spectators covering Mount Trebević cheered on the brave Sarajevo bobsled and luge competitors, as they raced down the 1.3km track at speeds of over 100 km/h, in snowy, blustery conditions. For several years after the Olympics, the Sarajevo bobsled track was used for world cup competitions. And then came the rub. When 1991 rolled around, the ugly and complex Yugoslav wars commenced, and the Olympic bobsled location was utilised by military forces as an artillery position.
More photos
In 1984, the very first Winter Olympics taking place in a communist state was held in the unique and remarkable city of Sarajevo — then a thriving metropolis in the now-defunct host nation Yugoslavia, now the modern capital city of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2014 — 30 years after the Sarajevo Winter Olympics — the seaside Russian city of Sochi also held the attention of television viewers, in the way only a former communist nation in a world entranced by Western media can, as it played host to the XXII Olympic Winter Games.

finish-bobsled-track-sarajevo

Yugoslavia doesn’t exist anymore, except in the minds of Yugo-stalgic lovers of all things Tito. Bosnia and Herzegovina is a democracy. Russia has given communism the flick, moving toward a decidedly more corporatocracy. And the cities of Sochi and Sarajevo share something else in common — an abandoned Winter Olympic site. As Sochi begins its inevitable decay, perhaps the abandoned Winter Olympic bobsled track high on Mount Trebević above Sarajevo will be an eerily accurate bellwether for Sochi’s Imeritinsky Beach.

bobsled-track-sarajevo-trebevic-2

At the time, a record 49 nations participated in the 1984 Winter Olympics. Tens of thousands of spectators covering Mount Trebević cheered on the brave Sarajevo bobsled and luge competitors, as they raced down the 1.3km track at speeds of over 100 km/h, in snowy, blustery conditions. For several years after the Olympics, the Sarajevo bobsled track was used for world cup competitions. And then came the rub. When 1991 rolled around, the ugly and complex Yugoslav wars commenced, and the Olympic bobsled location was utilised by military forces as an artillery position.

More photos